A man was running along the river, trying to save his drowning dog. He did save him in the end. He was scared when the dog was in the river, he was relaxed, when the dog was out. And the river? The river didn’t care.

There were times, when river was the fastest way to transport things around. That was one of the reasons why the early cities were always built near the riverbank. Boats of any kind were used, but when the industrial revolution started, the steamboats became the main means of transport both for people and goods.

But not anymore. Things have changed. Now we have planes, trains, cars. Nowadays, rivers are used only to transport large amount of raw material, such as coal or sand, because those are very heavy and it is the cheapest way to move them over long distances.

But what do you see, when you look at the river? Do you see just the water? Do you see only the waves? Or a huge amount of drops of water which are moving in a massive torrent forward?

The river is also a symbol. It can be a symbol of many things, but for most people it is a symbol of change. The waves which you can see now are not the same waves which you saw a minute ago. It is the water, but not the same water. It is the river, but not the same river. Everything is in flow. Everything is in a constant change.

Some people dream of the past days. When the rains were clean and so were the streams in the mountains. They dream of the days, when there were no factories and thus no pollution. They dream of the days when the virgin rivers ran down to the sea, the son of the ocean, where all the water ends.

But they can only dream of those days. Those days are forever gone.

Panta Rhei. Everything is in a constant flow.


steamboat /ˈstiːmbəʊt/ – parník

means of transport – dopravný prostriedok

raw material /ˌrɑː məˈtɪəriəl/ – surovina

goods /ɡʊdz/ – tovar

torrent /ˈtɒrənt/ – masívny prúd; príval

flow /fləʊ/ – prúd, prúdenie

constant /ˈkɒnstənt/ – neustály, konštantný

stream /striːm/ – potok, malá rieka

pollution /pəˈluːʃn/ – znečistenie

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